Lang & Reed Wine Company

 

 

Premier Etage

 

 

Vinography – A Wine Blog – Alder Yarrow
Medium to dark ruby in color this wine has a bright nose of hazelnut skin, black cherry,violets, and a tiny hint of green bell pepper to keep things real and the nose true to this varietal. In the mouth it is gorgeously smooth, like a baby's skin on satin sheets, and lush with flavors of black cherry, dark plum, violets, and lavender. With little or no trace of oak influence to be found, this wines tannins are quite airy and light, and not likely to be noticed by most, who will be too busy loving the gorgeous fruit and lengthy finish. Outstanding. Score 9.5/10 – Alder Yarrow – July 2009

Connoisseurs Guide to California Wine – May 2009
2004 Lang & Reed, Napa Valley Premier Étage Cabernet Franc

*89pts. An altogether different take on Cabernet Franc than its younger sibling [North Coast], the Premier Etage bottling is a full, slightly fatter and somewhat riper wine whose background of varietal tannins and its sweet oak are both a little more obvious, Still, this is not an overly tough wine, and while it could grow for another half dozen years, it will find its way smoothed in the near term by well seasoned roasts.

Randy Caparoso's Culinary Wine & Food Adventures
2004 Lang & Reed, Napa Valley Premier Étage Cabernet Franc
– “The relatively tight drinking quality of the ’04 is precisely the reason why Skupny holds back his reserves a heck of a lot longer than even Cabernet Sauvignon producers. While less effusive than in the ’03, the nose is flowery and perfumed (raspberry and violet); medium-full to full on the palate, showing a densely packed, piquant berry profile fused with toasted oak, finishing with briary twists of tobacco and tannin. Excellent now, but undoubtedly finer drinking in another year.” Randy Caparoso – October 2008


INTERNATIONAL WINE CELLAR

2004 Lang & Reed, Napa Valley Premier Étage Cabernet Franc – “Good deep red. Aromas of boysenberry, blueberry and leather. Fatter and more generous than the North Coast bottling, but with a stronger oak component a bit less energy and delineation of flavor. This slightly high-toned wine shows more oak tannins on the finish – 88points.”  Stephen Tanzer – May/June 2008

 

 

 

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